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DBT announces 2023 CEO of the Year honorees

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WILMINGTON — Delaware Business Times is excited to announce the 2023 honorees of its third annual CEO of the Year program.

The awards program honors the efforts of Delaware’s top-ranking business leaders in both for-profit and nonprofit sectors. The winners, chosen by an independent judging panel, will be honored at a July 19 charity golf outing, dinner and awards presentation at Deerfield Golf Club in Newark. Tickets are now available.

The annual program also features a Milestone Award winner, which recognizes an individual who has demonstrated significant, sustained success leading a business or nonprofit organization in Delaware while also making a positive, measurable contribution to the state’s community as a whole. The 2023 Milestone Award winner is George Krupanski.

George Krupanski Boys & Girls Club of Delaware

George Krupanski | PHOTO COURTESY OF BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF DE

Krupanski served as president and CEO of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Delaware for 27 years (1990-2017), overseeing a period of barrier-breaking growth of the nonprofit that serves to support and educate children. During his tenure, the organization began serving young girls for the first time after beginning as the Boys Clubs of Wilmington. The BGC Delaware also grew from two locations to 41 statewide, serving more than 30,000 youth annually by his retirement after serving about 3,200 at his start. The annual operational budget grew 12-fold, while its endowment doubled.

Krupanski became a valued executive in the nonprofit, advising the national BGC organization. He also serves as president of Dynamic Management Associates, a management consultant group for dozens of nonprofit agencies around the region. In Delaware, he has served on a number of boards outside of the BGC, including the Delaware Workforce Investment Board, Delaware Nature Society, Tower Hill School, New Castle County Chamber of Commerce, and United Way of Delaware, among others.

Mark Newman | PHOTO COURTESY OF CHEMOURS

The Large For-Profit CEO of the Year honoree is Mark Newman, president and CEO of Wilmington-based Chemours. Since taking the helm of the global chemical company in 2021, he has seen company revenues reach six-year highs, increasing more than 22% from pre-pandemic levels. Newman led the division of the company’s Fluoroproducts Segment, creating two strong independent divisions helping to advance next-generation, low-global-warming products. He has also been instrumental in Chemours’ investments in STEM education, backing a new STEM Hub in the Wilmington Riverside community, and its involvement with green energy production, including co-founding the Center for Clean Hydrogen at the University of Delaware last year.

Dr. Janice Nevin | PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTIANACARE

The Large Nonprofit CEO of the Year honoree is Dr. Janice Nevin, president and CEO of Newark-based ChristianaCare. Nevin led the state’s largest health care system through the COVID pandemic, overseeing a massive public push to vaccinate against the virus and supporting employee wellness through the stressful period. Last year, she also orchestrated the system’s first post-pandemic expansions, acquiring a former hospital in Chester County, Pa., and bringing primary care services to Sussex County. Nevin continues to be a strong voice for ChristianaCare, which has racked up top honors as one of the best health care systems in the country. Outside of her CEO role, she has served as a leader in the Delaware Business Roundtable and the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce.

Chris Baker | PHOTO COURTESY OF GEROGE & LYNCH

The Medium For-Profit CEO of the Year honoree is Chris Baker, president and CEO of Dover-based heavy construction firm George & Lynch. Rising from a summer laborer to the firm’s leader, Baker oversees the largest commercial contractor in the state. He recently led George & Lynch’s decision to convert ownership of the firm to an Employee-Owned Stock Program, one of just a handful of ESOPs in the state that give the employees ownership of the company’s success. Baker has also given back to his community, serving 13 years on the Lake Forest School District school board, including as president. He also serves as trustee to the University of Delaware and advisory board member for Easterseals Delaware and Maryland’s Eastern Shore, while establishing a charitable fund with Delaware Community Foundation with his wife to continue to support local causes.

Jane Pierantozzi | PHOTO COURTESY OF FFAS

The Medium Nonprofit CEO of the Year honoree is Jane Pierantozzi, executive director of Wilmington-based Faithful Friends Animal Society, a private animal welfare organization with a no-kill shelter and community veterinary clinic. Pierantozzi oversaw a major capital campaign to build a new, modern animal shelter that was severely impacted by the COVID pandemic. After regrouping in 2021, FFAS raised an additional $3.6 million above its original $7 million goal to account for inflation and supply chain costs, and they are now set to move into the facility in June. Pierantozzi’s compassion doesn’t stop with animals, dedicating many hours to serving Wilmington’s homeless shelters.

Mac Macleod | PHOTO COURTESY OF CARVERTISE

The Small For-Profit CEO of the Year honoree is Mac Macleod, CEO and co-founder of Wilmington-based Carvertise, the nation’s largest rideshare advertising company. Started while a University of Delaware student, Carvertise employs fleets of Uber and Lyft cars with branded logos to market products and services. Last year, the company saw 56% year-over-year sales growth and it moved into a new Riverfront headquarters. It’s worked with major brands like Netflix, Draft Kings, EA Sports and Wawa. Outside of the office, Macleod serves on boards with the state chamber, Delaware Business Roundtable, and Pete du Pont Freedom Foundation while also mentoring two local entrepreneurs.

Desa Burton | PHOTO COURTESY OF ZIP CODE WILMINGTON

The Small Nonprofit CEO of the Year honoree is Desa Burton, executive director of Zip Code Wilmington, a coding bootcamp that prepares students for in-demand jobs. Joining the nonprofit just a few months before the COVID pandemic struck, Burton had to quickly pivot the program’s in-person learning. Since then, Zip Code has also rolled out statewide high school front-end software that has now trained over 600 students. Last year, Burton also secured a four-year, annual $1.5 million grant for scholarships and stipends to support Zip Code students. Burton is a retired U.S. Navy officer who has worked to assist servicemembers re-entering civilian life.

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